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Trump’s controversial Fed nominee stalled after Senate setback | TheHill – The Hill

Judy Shelton’s Federal Reserve Board nomination failed to advance on Tuesday after coronavirus-related quarantines sidelined some Republican senators and Vice President-elect Kamala HarrisKamala HarrisPence to campaign in Georgia with Loeffler and Perdue on Friday Amanpour says she ‘regrets’ Trump-Kristallnacht comparison after criticism Karl Rove overseeing Republican financial effort to hold Georgia Senate seats MORE returned to the upper chamber to provide a crucial “no” vote.

Senators voted 47-50 to end debate on Shelton’s nomination, falling short of the simple majority needed. In a boon to Democrats, Harris, a Democratic senator from California, voted against Shelton’s nomination, preventing a tie.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellSenators clash on the floor over wearing masks: ‘I don’t need your instruction’ On The Money: Biden urges Congress to pass Democrats’ COVID-19 relief package | Fears of double-dip recession rise | SEC’s Clayton to resign at end of 2020 Overnight Defense: Pentagon prepping for Trump order to draw down in Afghanistan, Iraq | Questions swirl after DOD purge | 10th service member killed by COVID-19 MORE (R-Ky.) initially voted “yes” but with Shelton stuck at 48-49, he switched his vote, making the final tally 47-50. The move allows him to bring the nomination back up, something he immediately laid the groundwork to do. 

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The setback comes only days after President TrumpDonald John TrumpTucker Carlson assures viewers his show ‘not going anywhere’ following presidential election Trump senior advisers dissuaded president from military strike on Iran: report Senators clash on the floor over wearing masks: ‘I don’t need your instruction’ MORE‘s controversial pick appeared to be on a glide path to be confirmed to the Federal Reserve Board of Governors when Sen. Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann MurkowskiOn The Money: Biden urges Congress to pass Democrats’ COVID-19 relief package | Fears of double-dip recession rise | SEC’s Clayton to resign at end of 2020 Third GOP senator comes out against controversial Trump Fed nominee This week: Clock ticks on coronavirus, government funding deals MORE (R-Alaska) said she would support her.

But two Republicans — Sens. Chuck GrassleyCharles (Chuck) Ernest GrassleyGOP shows limited appetite for pursuing Biden probes The Hill’s Morning Report – Biden wins Arizona, confers with Dem leaders; Trump tweets The Hill’s Campaign Report: GOP senators say Biden deserves intel briefings l Biden speaks with Democratic leaders about COVID l Where the Georgia runoffs stand MORE (Iowa) and Rick Scott (Fla.) — are currently quarantined due to exposure to the coronavirus, throwing a late curveball into the Senate’s consideration of her nomination.

“We have some attendance issues, so it’s a little bit fluid, I’d say, at the moment,” said Sen. John ThuneJohn Randolph ThuneWe need a (common) ‘sense of the Senate’ resolution on transition planning Senate Republicans urge Trump to go all-in on Georgia McConnell reelected as Senate GOP leader MORE (S.D.), the No. 2 Senate Republican, on Tuesday about Shelton.

Thune said that he believed Republicans would have the votes to confirm Shelton once senators were done quarantining, but added that “there is a little bit of a complicated factor in the Arizona seat.” Sen.-elect Mark KellyMark KellyMark Kelly reflects on using McCain’s old desk: ‘He was a hero of mine’ McSally concedes Arizona Senate race Rick Scott taps top aides to head Senate campaign committee MORE (D-Ariz.) can be seated as soon as Nov. 30.

Three GOP senators are opposed to Shelton: Sens. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsOn The Money: Biden urges Congress to pass Democrats’ COVID-19 relief package | Fears of double-dip recession rise | SEC’s Clayton to resign at end of 2020 Third GOP senator comes out against controversial Trump Fed nominee This week: Clock ticks on coronavirus, government funding deals MORE (Maine), Mitt RomneyWillard (Mitt) Mitt RomneyOn The Money: Biden urges Congress to pass Democrats’ COVID-19 relief package | Fears of double-dip recession rise | SEC’s Clayton to resign at end of 2020 Third GOP senator comes out against controversial Trump Fed nominee This week: Clock ticks on coronavirus, government funding deals MORE (Utah) and Lamar AlexanderAndrew (Lamar) Lamar AlexanderOn The Money: Biden urges Congress to pass Democrats’ COVID-19 relief package | Fears of double-dip recession rise | SEC’s Clayton to resign at end of 2020 Third GOP senator comes out against controversial Trump Fed nominee Profiles in cowardice: Trump’s Senate enablers MORE (Tenn.). Their opposition, combined with the quarantining, capped Shelton’s “yes” votes at 48.

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Collins said shortly before the vote that she wouldn’t “pair” with an absent colleague, a procedural move that would offset their absence.

“I am very concerned about her position on the independence of the Fed and even questioning the need for a central bank, and for those reasons I cannot support her nomination and will vote no,” Collins said.

Sen. Pat RobertsCharles (Pat) Patrick RobertsBusiness groups scramble to forge ties amid race for House Agriculture chair Republicans hold on to competitive Kansas House seat Marshall wins Kansas Senate race MORE (R-Kan.) voted to end debate on her nomination on Tuesday but told reporters only hours earlier that he was undecided about confirming her.

Speculations swirled earlier Tuesday that Vice President Pence might be able to break a tie if Harris was absent, because that would have deadlocked the Shelton vote at 48-48.

But Sen. Dick DurbinDick DurbinDemocratic senators urge Facebook to take action on anti-Muslim bigotry Democrats look to sharpen message after Senate setback The Hill’s 12:30 Report: What to know about the Pfizer vaccine announcement MORE (D-Ill.) said he had asked Harris to return. She was spotted fist-bumping with her colleagues, including Republican Sens. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamGraham denies pressuring top Georgia election official to throw out some ballots Georgia secretary of state says Graham, other Republicans have pressured him to toss legal ballots The Hill’s 12:30 Report – Presented by Capital One – World reacts to news of second COVID-19 vaccine with 90 percent efficacy MORE (S.C.) and Tim ScottTimothy (Tim) Eugene ScottTrump told advisers he could announce 2024 bid shortly after certification of Biden win: report Trump, Pence, Haley top GOP 2024 betting odds at Bovada Lobbying world MORE (S.C.), on the Senate floor during the Shelton vote.

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Shelton was already facing a tight path to confirmation after being held in limbo for months due to bipartisan opposition over her previous support for returning to the gold standard and using interest rates as a tool to make U.S. exports more competitive.

If Shelton is confirmed, she would fill one of two vacant seats on the seven-person Fed board of governors. All but two of those seats have been filled by Trump, despite Senate Republicans rejecting four of his previous Fed picks.

–Updated at 4:35 p.m.

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